Galatians 6 9: 3 Tips When You Feel Weary

Galatians 6 9 is a verse I quote often when I feel like giving up but know that I must press on. It’s an inspiring verse and maybe you’ve found yourself using it in a similar, so let’s spend a few minutes digging into Galatians 6 9 so we can get a better understanding of the verse.

The Context of Galatians 6 9

The letter to the Galatians was written by Paul as an encouragement to remain faithful. As it was with so many of his letters, Paul addressed specific topics that were of doctrinal importance.

There was a huge break in the church between those who believed that the Gentiles should follow the laws of the Torah and those who believed that they didn’t. Paul wrote to remind the church that the Law was an imperfect and temporary measure meant to point the Israelites to Christ.

In Galatians 6, Paul reminds the believers that they have a duty to bear each other’s burden. If one person sins, it should be an opportunity for others to gently restore them to the faith. It should not be a gloating moment because all of us are fallible and can fall into sin.

Remember, Paul tells the church, we reap what we sow. If we sow things that originate with the carnal man, we will reap destruction. But if we sow the things that originate from the Holy Spirit, we will reap eternal life.

But, Paul continues, don’t get weary of doing good because eventually, you’ll reap a reward.

Galatians 6 9 Meaning

The words of Galatians 6 9 must have felt like a breath of fresh air in a letter that may have seemed to be full of chastisement. After a crash course in Christian doctrine, Paul reminds them that they had so much to gain if only they would remain faithful until the end.

What “do not faint or grow weary” means

Let’s deconstruct this verse to see if we can get a better understanding of it.

Galatians 6 9 begins,

And let us not grow weary while doing good, (NKJV)

Let’s look at the original language as we begin to study this verse.

The word translated as the phrase “let us…be weary” is the Greek word ekkakéō, (pronounced ek-kak-eh’-o) and could have been translated to mean to be (bad or) weak, i.e. (by implication) to fail (in heart), faint, be weary.

The word is typically used in the Bible to mean to be utterly spiritless, to be wearied out, exhausted.

Lessons from Galatians 6 9
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I don’t know about you, but when I read the last sentence I got the impression of someone who is exhausted beyond their capabilities, someone who just can’t take another step or do one more thing.

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Maybe you’ve met people like that, they started out with so much promise and enthusiasm but life threw them a bunch of messed up things until they were just worn out.

As Christians, the Galatians were serving their community in various ways through their good works. Yet, Paul is telling them not to get weary while doing good. Can doing good wear a person out?

It seems like an oxymoron, doesn’t it? But if you think about it, you’ll realize that serving others can take a toll on a person–mind, body, and soul.

And when a person gets weary of serving one if two things happen. Either they begin to exhibit apathy and disdain for those they serve, or they quit. Both results could be detrimental for the body of believers.

When we were out of a weary spirit, we turn people away from God. We fail to communicate the joy of being part of the family of God and as such, we don’t entice people to want to become part of the body of Christ.

What does due season mean?

Now that we understand what it means to not grow faint or weary, let’s look at the second part of Galatians 6 9,

for in due season we shall reap if we do not lose heart (NKJV)

The phrase “in due season” are actually two Greek words: ídios and kairós.

The word ídios, (pronounced id’-ee-os) and is used in the context pertaining to self, i.e. one’s own; by implication, private or separate.

Kairós (pronounced kahee-ros’) means an occasion, i.e. set or proper time, opportunity, (convenient, due) season, (due, short, while) time, a while.

If we were to put the definitions of the two Greek words together, it would be something like “in it’s own set time”.

“In its own set time” may not seem like the best thing to say to someone who feels like giving up because it suggests that things are going to happen when they happen. But here’s the thing, God’s timing is not like ours so we need to get comfortable waiting on Him.

We have to understand that God’s timing is perfect and He has things arranged to happen in a set time. Nothing will happen before its ordained time.

3 Tips to Not Get Weary

I wish I could tell you that unlike the church at Galatia you’ll never get weary of doing good.  But maybe you’re in a situation where you’re getting a little bit weary of waiting and all that’s involved.

The Christian journey can seem like a long, uphill walk. But we can find encouragement in Galatians 6 9. Here are three things you can do to refresh yourself if you start to feel weary while doing good.

1. Remember what’s at stake.

Our lives on earth are temporary.  As much as social norms would like to try and convince is that we only know once, as Christians we have a better hope.

Set your minds on things that are above, not on things that are on earth. Colossians 3:2 ESV

As we set our minds on heavenly things, we remember why we strive to do good while on earth. There’s a heaven to gain and a hell to shun and so we keep pressing towards our goal.

2. Remember why you’re doing it.

Doing things without having a clear purpose can quickly cause us to lose motivation. So remember why you serve. You do good because Jesus made the ultimate sacrifice on your behalf: He died for you.

For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. John 3:16 ESV

All of us have sinned for which the penalty is death (Romans 6:23) but Jesus paid the price on our behalf. Remember the sacrifice Jesus made for you and keep doing good.

3. Remember that Jesus gives you rest.

I get it, friend, doing good can make you feel weary especially when you’re surrounded by people who want to take but refuse to give. But you don’t have to bear all the burden by yourself.

Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Matthew 11:28 ESV

Jesus invites us to come to Him and He will give us the rest our souls so desperately crave. Bring your burdens to the Lord and He’ll not only give you rest, but He’ll also help you to remain faithful until the end.

You Will Reap A Harvest

Galatians 6 9 is a reminder that though it may seem as if there’s no end in sight for the good work we’re doing, there is a reward at the end of the journey.

God allows us to be coworkers with Him to get His word out so that all the nations can know Him. He didn’t need us to do that because He could have easily done it Himself or through nature or … talking animals. But He didn’t. He wanted us to be involved in this great work with Him.

We have a tendency to give up when things get hard but God used Paul to tell us not to lose hope. Yes, it will be hard. People will hate us. The enemy will make it difficult to do the work that needs to be done. But. If we remain faithful … the reward will far exceed the work, the trials, the hardships, the pain.

I love the way Galatians 6 9 is rendered in the God’s Word Translation:

“We can’t allow ourselves to get tired of living the right way. Certainly, each of us will receive [everlasting life] at the proper time, if we don’t give up.”

Isn’t that beautiful? So many times as Christians we are tempted to give up because it’s too hard or none of our friends are doing it or because it seems as though Jesus is never going to come. But somehow we have to find a way to push past that by remembering that God is faithful.

Are you tempted to give up? Don’t lose hope. Jehovah sees our efforts and He will reward us if we don’t give up. What’s your favorite lesson from Galatians 6 9?

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